The Catholic University of America’s Service and Volunteer Activities

 

Catholic University of America  pic

Catholic University of America
Image: catholic.edu

Daniel Pezzola recently began a year of service with FrancisCorps in Syracuse, New York. Prior to his work with FrancisCorps, Daniel Pezzola attended the Catholic University of America, where he studied politics and took part in the school’s various outreach activities.

Located in Washington, DC, the Catholic University of America (CUA) oversees a variety of service programs and events for students who want to get involved in the surrounding community. Each week, CUA students can take part in a number of ongoing outreach activities in the areas of education, hospitality, aging and disability, and hunger and homelessness.

CUA works with Beacon House, Girls in Action, Justice for Juniors, and other youth organizations to provide tutoring, mentoring, and after-school support services. Volunteers from the university also spend time at the local Ronald McDonald House and hold special outreach events in Washington’s Brookland neighborhood.

Other weekly volunteer activities at CUA benefit organizations that support senior citizens and individuals with disabilities. They include the Armed Forces Retirement Home, Bethlehem House, and Little Sisters of the Poor.

In the area of homelessness and food insecurity, the university oversees food runs and other outreach activities three times a week in downtown Washington. CUA students also volunteer for So Others Might Eat, a local interfaith organization that provides food, clothing, and services to those in need.

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Mets Release Outfielder Norichika Aoki

 

Norichika Aoki pic

Norichika Aoki
Image: m.mlb.com

Working as a delivery driver for the Washingtonville Pharmacy in New York, Daniel Pezzola is also responsible for creating orders, counting out medication, and ringing out customers. Away from work, Daniel Pezzola is a life-long fan of the New York Mets baseball team.

After the Mets season ended in late October, the team released veteran outfielder Norichika Aoki. Now a free agent, Aoki played with the team for only two months.

Aoki was brought into the team in September, when the Mets struggled to perform with many key players injured. During his time with the team, Aoki’s record stood at .284/.371/.373.

Though the Mets have yet to solidify their outfield roster for the 2018 season, Aoki posed too much of a financial risk for the team. According to the MLB website, Aoki was let go in part over budget concerns, with the Mets needing to ensure they have enough capital to acquire players for multiple positions, including both a starting pitcher and a relief pitcher.

FIFA 18 Introduces Playable Female Character in Story Mode

 

 FIFA 18pic

FIFA 18
Image: easports.com

In 2015, Daniel Pezzola worked for Macy’s in its shoe department, where he quickly rose to first in sales among the store’s part-time associates. He currently works as a delivery driver for Washingtonville Pharmacy in Washingtonville, New York. In his free time, Daniel Pezzola enjoys playing the FIFA soccer games on his Sony PlayStation 4.

The latest entry in the FIFA series, FIFA 18, is the first to include a playable female character in the game’s story mode, “The Journey: Hunter Returns.” While players start off playing as Alex Hunter, a male character who debuted in last year’s FIFA game, they soon take on the role of his half-sister, Kim Hunter.

The move follows on the heels of another first for the franchise, when the 2016 edition introduced 12 women’s national teams, marking the first time players could use female characters in the soccer series. The series’ developers collected extensive motion capture data for the female players, as they felt overlaying female bodies on top of the existing male animations would not have been authentic.

Cam Weber, general manager for EA Sports, estimates that over a third of those who play their titles are female. He hopes to keep evolving the FIFA series, as well as other EA Sports titles, to be more inclusive and representative of those players.

Conversing with a Person Who Is Homeless

Homeless pic

Homeless
Image: operationwarm.org

An active member of the Catholic church, Daniel Pezzola attended the Catholic University of America and belongs to the St. Patrick’s Church council. From 2015 through 2016, Daniel Pezzola served as a leader of homeless outreach activities.

When interacting with a person or family who is homeless, your first goal should be to help them understand that you acknowledge their worth as people. This may seem like a bare-minimum expectation, but the sad truth is that people on the street often do not feel valued. People walk by them, perhaps handing them a bit of money, but rarely make eye contact.

You can help to counteract this pattern by looking each homeless person in the eye and letting your compassion shine through. A simple smile can be enough to show that you see and respect the person, but it is even better if you can start a brief conversation.

Some people fear that asking “How are you doing?” will garner an aggressive response, but this is rarely the case. You may even get lucky and have the chance to hear someone’s story. If you ever feel unsafe, however, you have the right to excuse yourself.

You may choose to give a little bit of money at the end of a conversation, but you need not feel obligated. Many people feel more comfortable offering to buy the person a meal, while others keep bags of simple necessities to hand out to people on the streets. These bags can contain things like toothpaste and socks, which make life slightly less uncomfortable and can communicate genuine caring.